Print Awareness: Using Books

Parents and caregivers make the difference by just modeling the importance of reading, surrounding children with books, and engaging in the learning process. By doing these simple things, children have a better chance at succeeding in school and throughout each aspect of their lives. For the next couple of weeks, we will be posting the six literacy skills and strategies you can use to practice each skill at home with your family.

Today’s topic is PRINT AWARENESS, or using books:

  • Read aloud everyday! Take turns reading each page.
  • Find a series of favorite author that will keep your child reading.
  • Read different types of books like nonfiction, poetry, biographies, etc.
  • Point out the parts of a book to your child.

Choosing a favorite book, series, or author will keep your child excited about reading constantly. If it’s an author who continues to add to a popular series, make sure you ask your librarian about getting your name on the holds list so your child will be one of the first to read it as soon as it comes out. Participate in book-themed programs at the library. Join a parent/child book club. It’s also important to read the same book as your child–you’ll be able to discuss the characters and storyline together. This gives your child the attention, bonding and communication he needs and can help reading seem relevant to his life.

For some great reads, check out these books:

We are in a Book! by Mo Willems
Press Here by Herve Tullet
Don’t Push the Button by Bill Cotter
The Foggy Foggy Forest by Nick Sharatt
Tap the Magic Tree by Christie Matheson

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Print Motivation: Loving Books

Parents and caregivers make the difference by just modeling the importance of reading, surrounding children with books, and engaging in the learning process. By doing these simple things, children have a better chance at succeeding in school and throughout each aspect of their lives. For the next couple of weeks, we will be posting the six literacy skills and strategies you can use to practice each skill at home with your family.

Today’s topic is PRINT MOTIVATION, or teaching your child to love books:

  • Make book sharing time special!
  • Don’t leave home without a book or magazine.
  • Let your child choose a book to read each day.
  • Visit the library often!

Just simply having books available is the first step in teaching your child about books and reading. Giving them time to explore the books and experience the different parts. Using vocabulary (something we talked about last time) like author, illustrator, spine, front cover, title, etc. expands your child’s word knowledge as well.

Acting out stories is also a great way to bring a book to life and make it more fun.

Here are some great books your child will love reading:

Wild About Books by Judy Sierra
Giraffes Can’t Dance by Giles Andreae
The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt
Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss
The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs! by Jon Scieszka

Vocabulary: Word Knowledge

Parents and caregivers make the difference by just modeling the importance of reading, surrounding children with books, and engaging in the learning process. By doing these simple things, children have a better chance at succeeding in school and throughout each aspect of their lives. For the next couple of weeks, we will be posting the six literacy skills and strategies you can use to practice each skill at home with your family.

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We will begin with VOCABULARY, or simply put, words:

  • Talk with your child about what is going on around you.
  • Talk about unknown and interesting words. Create a word of the day challenge.
  • Read together, discussing the story and pictures.
  • Point out words that have similar meanings.

Don’t be afraid of using “bigger, fancier” words. Let your child hear unusual words to help expand their word knowledge. Use a dictionary often.

To help develop word knowledge and vocabulary, the most important thing you can do with your child is READ. Here are some great books for children Kindergarten through Grade 3:

Previously by Allan Ahlberg
Big, Bigger, Biggest by Nancy Coffelt
Mom and Dad Are Palindromes by Mark Shulman
The Boy Who Loved Words by Roni Schotter
The Case of the Incapacitated Capitals by Robin Pulver