Book Review: BunnyBear

Today’s blog was written by one of our very own children’s storytellers: Miss Elizabeth. You’ll find Miss Elizabeth sharing stories with children of all ages as well as creating wonderful children’s programs at one of our branches. She shares her review of the book BunnyBear by Andrea J. Loney. 

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BunnyBear may be a bear on the outside, but he doesn’t act like other bears.  He loves to pick and eat strawberries, hop around, and enjoy life in a calm manner. 

Bears don’t understand him, and bunnies are afraid of him.  Bunnybear wants to be accepted by the other bunnies, but he feels left out.  One day he meets Grizzlybun, a little bunny with a lot of confidence.  She loves to stomp her paws, growl, and make sure she’s noticed.  Grizzlybun quickly teaches Bunnybear it’s best to be oneself, as long as they’re true to who they are on the inside.

You can find BunnyBear along with other great titles about acceptance and being yourself at your favorite Stark County District Library! Make sure you tell your librarian how you liked the book.

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Book Review: Lucy

9780763668082Today’s blog was written by one of our very own children’s storytellers: Miss Elizabeth. You’ll find Miss Elizabeth sharing stories with children of all ages as well as creating wonderful children’s programs at one of our branches. She shares her review of the book Lucy by Randy Cecil. 

A homeless dog, a little girl, and a father with a dream make up this simple, sweet story titled Lucy by Randy Cecil.  Lucy, the dog, spends her days searching for food and becomes friends with Eleanor, the little girl.  Eleanor’s father spends his days attempting to make it as a juggler, but his nerves get the best of him.  The three characters’ lives weave together to create a happy ending. 

While some may consider this to be a picture book, I consider this to be a delightful early reader.  This is the perfect book for a child who may be intimidated by too many words or sentences on a page, but is still in search of a book with a bit of length. 

There are simple, soft illustrations on every page that enable the reader to fully grasp the story, even without reading the text.  The book is set up in four acts with a chapter book format, albeit brief enough to keep the young reader engaged.

 

Book Review: Goodbye Summer, Hello Autumn

Today’s blog was written by one of our very own children’s storytellers: Miss Elizabeth. You’ll find Miss Elizabeth sharing stories with children of all ages as well as creating wonderful children’s programs at one of our branches. She shares her review of the book Goodbye Summer, Hello Autumn by Kenard Pak.

Image result for goodbye summer hello autumnSome say nothing is more beautiful than nature.  There are vibrant colors, lakes and rivers, and animals noisily scurrying or perhaps lazily wandering.  When seasons change, so does the sky, wind, and temperature.  All of those pleasant experiences are captured so masterfully in the beautifully illustrated book Goodbye Summer, Hello Autumn by Kenard Pak

Pak uses conversational text between a young girl and nature throughout the book.  The girl greets everything she sees on her journey through her hometown in late summer, and nature responds as it prepares for autumn. 

This watercolor wonder is my top choice for the Caldecott Award this year.

 

Book Review: Raymie Nightingale

Today’s blog was written by one of our very own children’s storytellers: Miss Elizabeth. You’ll find Miss Elizabeth sharing stories with children of all ages as well as creating wonderful children’s programs at one of our branches. She shares her review of the book Raymie Nightingale by Kate DiCamillo.

Image resultIt’s the summer of 1975, and Raymie Clarke has one goal in mind: to reconnect her family.  In order to do so, she has to win the Little Miss Central Florida Tire competition.  And in order to win, she must learn how to twirl a baton and perform a good deed, like Florence Nightingale. 

During her baton twirling lessons, Raymie meets two competitors, Louisiana Elefante and Beverly Tapinski.  While struggling to come to terms with her separated family and other personal issues, Raymie quickly understands the grass isn’t always greener on the other side.  All three girls learn that to get through tough times, it’s best to make friends and stick together.

Be sure to check out this book from your local library!

 

Book Review: The Seventh Wish

Today’s blog was written by one of our very own children’s storytellers: Miss Elizabeth. You’ll find Miss Elizabeth sharing stories with children of all ages as well as creating wonderful children’s programs at one of our branches. She shares her review of the book The Seventh Wish by Kate Messner.

seventhwishHave you ever made a wish?

Some people may wish on a shooting star, while others are granted wishes from genies in bottles.  But what if you could make a wish on a fish?

In Kate Messner’s newest book, The Seventh Wish, seventh grader Charlie discovers a unique fish while out on the ice.  The fish offers to grant wishes so long as Charlie releases it back into the water.  While Charlie intends to use her wishes to help her friends and family, things don’t go according to plan.  Charlie soon learns it’s sometimes best to create your own outcomes instead of waiting for a fish wish to come to fruition.

Geared toward tweens, this story has some serious situations but weaves through the details thoughtfully

Book Review: Pete the Cat’s Got Class

Today’s blog was written by one of our very own children’s storytellers: Miss Elizabeth. You’ll find Miss Elizabeth sharing stories with children of all ages as well as creating wonderful children’s programs at one of our branches. She shares her review of the book Pete the Cat’s Got Class by James Dean.

51Zg+cghrYL__SX258_BO1,204,203,200_It’s the perfect read for children as they are preparing to head back to school.

Pete heads to math class in this story, which is one of his favorite subjects. He’s such a great mathematician that he volunteers to help his classmate Tom learn to add and subtract using Tom’s favorite toy, racing cars. Using something of great interest to learn a new task was successful! Maybe Pete will grow up to be a teacher?

Be sure to checkout this book at your local library, and let your librarian know how you liked it!

Book Review: Red Hat

red hatRed Hat by Lita Judge is one of my favorite (almost) wordless picture books. It’s a story about forest animals who find a knitted red hat and play with it all day long. Eventually, the hat becomes unraveled. The animals put the hat (or string) back where they found it and hide unsure what the owner might do. The owner of the hat finds the string and realizes what has happened. She ends up knitting hats for all of the animals.

The only words in the book are sounds like “wooo” and “swish swash.” The watercolor illustrations are beautifully done. And fans of Lita Judge may recognize the hat from Red Sled.

Making up the story to go with the illustrations is a great reason to read wordless picture books with your children. While the pictures dictate what will happen in the story, children can make up the words to go with the pictures by using creativity and prior knowledge–two topics that are very important when it comes to comprehension and storytelling.

Book Review: Birdie’s Big Hair

Today’s blog was written by one of our very own children’s storytellers: Miss Sharifa. You’ll find Miss Sharifa sharing stories with children of all ages as well as creating wonderful children’s programs. She shares her review of the picture book Birdie’s Big Hair by Sujean Rim.

birdies big hairBirdie’s Big Hair is one of my favorite books. Birdie wakes up one day and her hair has become unruly so her mom tells her she’s going to take her to the hair salon. So we follow the excitement of Birdie going to the hair salon with her mother. The book shows Birdie’s imagination as she daydreams of what her hair will look like once she goes to the hair salon with her mother.

The book has interesting pictures showcasing different patterns of fabric swatches on Birdie’s and other character’s clothes. This book is fun and lighthearted. The story will make you smile as you follow Birdie through her hair journey to find a new hair style. This is a great book for children that love to get their hair done.

Be sure to checkout this book at your local library, and let your librarian know how you liked it!

Book Review: By Mouse and Frog

Today’s blog was written by one of our very own children’s librarians: Miss Dayna. You’ll find Miss Dayna sharing stories with children of all ages as well as creating wonderful children’s programs. She shares her review of the picture book By Mouse and Frog by Deborah Freedman.

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Once upon a time Mouse was writing a story.  In jumps Frog full of ideas.  Frog adds cake and ice cream and a whole list of things to the story.  Mouse has to find a way to tell Frog this is Mouse’s story.  Together the two friends then find a way to write together.

A wonderful book about imagination and friendship.  Frog’s character is reminiscent to Tigger’s in the Winnie the Pooh stories.

Be sure to checkout this book at your local library and let your librarian know how you liked it!